Use alcohol as a plot device


I wandered into the kitchen and waved my hand uselessly at the cupboard with the painkillers in.
‘Morning, champ,’ said Pete. I turned to face him and my brains swilled in my head like unset jelly.
‘What are you... here... for?’ I managed.
‘Slept on the sofa, didn’t I?’ he said. ‘Thought I’d better make sure you got home okay, what with you picking that fight with the Mafia boss and everything.’
‘Wha?’ I mumbled.
‘And you stumbled upon a dossier of top-secret government files, and drunk-dialled your boss and quit your job, and acted on the long-standing sexual tension between you and Julie from accounts.’
‘In a good way?’ I asked, trying to guide a glass of water to my mouth. Pete shook his head. ‘Oh,’ I said. ‘I feel awful and I don’t remember anything.’
‘Yup,’ said Pete. ‘But on the upside, you initiated a few promising narrative strands which would otherwise have seemed completely unrealistic.’

9 comments:

  1. I hate morning after scenes. That's why this is brilliant.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Well, except if it's by Douglas Adams ;)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Were you out drinking with Dogberry? Between you I have collected a variety of descriptions of hangovers this week.

    Your main character can now go on to have odd flashbacks to the evening, and spend large amounts of time trying to untangle reality (if it exists) from all the other versions of the evening.

    ReplyDelete
  4. drunk-dialled?

    ReplyDelete
  5. This was actually a major plot device in the movie The Hangover, and it worked really well !

    ReplyDelete
  6. Can we do something to complain about the overuse of intoxication in gay romance to initiate egres from the metaphorical closet?
    Taking into consideration that gay romance is most likely not a thing most of you read or care about. Still bugs me.

    ReplyDelete