Plot your folktale at random


Dear readers,

Continuing last week’s experiment in randomly generated storytelling, here is another tool for your writerly toolbox. There are fewer possible outcomes this time, but the results are more genre-specific:


All the best,
Joel

13 comments:

  1. Joseph Campbell could have saved me a lot of time if he'd explained it like that.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I like my story of the boastful warrior who ends up lost and alone in the dark woods, and eventually, after receiving aid from nature herself, finds himself reduced to begging in the street.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Yeah, there's a kind of grim schadenfreude to that. He suffers, seeks redemption and still gets his comeuppance. Nature knows what she's doing.

    ReplyDelete
  4. This is the story of a hideous monster who fount themselves unjustly imprisoned. Eventualy after solving a series of riddles they lost everything they held dear.

    ReplyDelete
  5. This is the story of an unlucky fisherman who found himself left in charge of a nobleman's house. Eventually, after adopting an ingenious disguise, he was punished with a magical curse.
    On to illustrations.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Yeah, I may need to adjust for more happy endings. These are all something of a downer.

    ReplyDelete
  7. “This is the story of a slow-witted bear who found himself in love with one above his station. Eventually, after solving a series of riddles, he died alone and forgotten.”

    Does anyone else picture Winnie the Pooh as the protagonist?

    ReplyDelete
  8. I always thought Piglet was too good for him.

    ReplyDelete
  9. *does not own a twenty-sided die*
    *sad*

    ReplyDelete
  10. Strange. The opposite correlation is more common.

    ReplyDelete
  11. This is the internet - we have virtual dice: www.wizards.com/dnd/dice/dice.htm
    Actual randomness not guaranteed.

    I only know they're there because I was trying to use a ridiculously complicated Dr Who plot generator and it was easier than mucking about with the Excel's random function... wait, that's probably a sadder explanation.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Yeehah! I'm your 1000th follower. Do I get a prize? Like, maybe, a free copy of the Random Folk Tale Roller?

    ReplyDelete
  13. You know what? You can have a prize. Email me your postal address (to writebadlywell@gmail.com) and I'll send you a free book. Why not? You only hit a thousand once. Same offer applies for number 2,000, so tell your friends.

    ReplyDelete