Use “fate” as a plot device


‘So,’ George said, settling back in his chair. ‘Having seen all the candidates, what are your thoughts?’ Louise tapped her pen on the table.
‘Well,’ she said, ‘I thought Jules was a fairly good fit. Ingrid had the most impressive CV in terms of past experience. But I think we should go with David.’ George nodded.
‘I’d be tempted to agree,’ he said. ‘Despite not really being suitable for the position or having any of the relevant qualifications, I think David’s the right choice, mostly because it’s his destiny.’
‘Yes,’ said Louise, thoughtfully. ‘He doesn’t seem to know a lot about marketing per se, but getting this job would be the first step in his meteoric rise to power and eventual corruption in a personal plot arc that echoes, among other texts, Citizen Kane and the fall of Lucifer.’
‘I’d have to concur,’ said George. ‘He was bumbling and inarticulate in the interview, his CV is written on what looks like a paper hand-towel and he was unapologetically an hour late for his appointment, but I think he’s the guy for the job.’
‘What are you going to write on the form?’
‘I’ll just put “indefinable sense of narrative momentum.”’

12 comments:

  1. *snort* Try telling that to George Lucas!

    ReplyDelete
  2. you need to have this conversation with the writers at Lost

    ReplyDelete
  3. He has to pass his probation first.

    :-)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Terry Pratchett plays with this concept brilliantly in his Discworld novels, which take place in a fantasy setting where "narrative causality" is a real phenomenon.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Would that it could be true. Fate indeed.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I was meant to enjoy this. Thanks, Joel, for following your inner promptings and helping to fulfill our common end.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Fuuuuuuuuuunny!

    ReplyDelete
  8. This reminds me of The Office episode where David Brent picks up half the C.V.s he's reviewing and dumps them in the bin saying "I don't hire unlucky people".

    ReplyDelete
  9. I dunno, this sounds like a lot of political rhetoric come election time. It was Mrs. Clinton's destiny, now it's Mr. Obama's, there are stage whispers of Mrs. Palin's destiny....

    ReplyDelete
  10. @Ieatpants - I thought the exact same thing.

    ReplyDelete
  11. There's a big difference between a job interview and a work of fiction.

    ReplyDelete